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Passing By

Photo Credits:  Emerging Terrain © 2012
Photo Credits:  Bryce Bridges © 2012
Finished in May 2012

by: Kimberly Glass
Medium: Mural, Mixed Media
Dimensions: 20' x 80'
Part of the Stored Potential Two

Location

Downtown
Grain Silo 3417 Vinton St. Omaha NE
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Description

Banner with colorful lines and latitude and longitude

Additional Information

“Passing By,” the banner submission by Omaha artist Kimberly Glass, uses latitude and longitude interwoven with dynamic horizontal lines; the former marks the particular point on the Earth’s surface where the grain elevator structure sits, and the lines imply the speed and movement past the structure that defines our interaction with it. “Passing By” references our city’s infrastructure and growth, and how we inhabitants and builders of place gather miles of progress under ourselves. As we “pass by” we are reminded that we are built upon Nebraska’s own history and identity rooted in its rich soil.

In this Series

Other Search Results for Stored Potential Two
Showing all 12 records


A Friendly Reminder (Stored Potential Two), May 2012

by Ashley Byars; Bill DeRoin

 

Medium: Mural, Mixed Media

Location: Downtown; Grain silo 3417 Vinton St. Omaha NE

Owner: Emerging Terrain

Series: Stored Potential Two

Additional Information: ‘A Friendly Reminder’ by architectural designers Ashley Byars and Bill DeRoin seeks to graphically illustrate the gasoline consumption of an average daily Omaha commute. The purpose of the banner is not to incite or inflame, but to make visible something not typical seen. As suggested by the common phase “A picture is worth 1000 words”, seeing a statistic graphically can be more profound then reading it. Bill and Ashley hope the illustration encourages discussion about fuel consumption, commuting, and transportation in Omaha. The banner attempts to answer the question: “How much of a silo would be filled with all the gas used in Omaha’s typical daily commute?” The quickest place to start was determining the volume capacity of a single grain elevator. For the sake of simplicity, the silos were perceived as perfectly hollow cylinders with thin exterior walls and an average dimension of 12.5’ radius and 101’ height. With these dimensions the volume (V=[pi]R^2 x H) was calculated to be 49,553 cubic feet. The next (and more difficult) calculation to find was a quantifiable value for how much gasoline Omaha commuters use on a daily basis. Employing various methods including online resources and actually driving typical commute routes, the following criteria was determined: No. of Omaha Passenger Vehicle Commuters = 273,936 (1) Average Passenger Vehicle Fuel Efficiency = 21 mpg (2) Average Omaha Commuting Time = 17.3 Minutes (3) Average Omaha Commuting Distance = 13.3 miles 273,936 commuters x 13.3miles / 21 mpg and reached the value of 172,188 gallons, or 23,018 cubic feet. This volume was placed into the elevator volume capacity, and resulted in a final value of the daily gasoline consumption equaling roughly 46.5% capacity of a typical silo.


Ant Trails (Stored Potential Two), May 2012

by Bethany Kalk

 

Medium: Mural, Mixed Media

Location: Downtown; Grain Silo 3417 Vinton St. Omaha NE

Owner: Emerging Terrain

Series: Stored Potential Two

Additional Information: By intertwining the networks of constructed roadways in Omaha with ‘transport’ formations produced by insects – ant trails and bee honeycombs – Ant Trails is a visualization of the similarity and interconnection between human and natural realms of movement. It is always interesting to find out how submission ideas come into being; while Bethany was pondering her entry, she was babysitting her nieces and took them on a walk. They were overturning rocks on a hunt for insects to lessen their fear of “bugs.” Under many rocks were ant trails and the correlation became obvious; ants and humans transport food (and goods) with similar methods of networked systems. The honeycomb form of ‘food storage’ layers yet another important process into the overall image and idea. All these networks represented here at the same scale blurs the hierarchy of our often competing worlds and renders them equal in importance.


Around The Bend (This Exit) (Stored Potential Two), May 2012

by Bob Trempe

 

Medium: Mural, Mixed Media

Location: Downtown; Grain Silo 3417 Vinton St. Omaha NE

Owner: Emerging Terrain

Series: Stored Potential Two

Additional Information: ‘Around the Bend (This Exit)’ employs statistical information as an organizational strategy towards a trans-formative image, a composition that morphs from an iconic image of the Omaha city skyline to over 10,000 icons depicting transportation usage in Omaha. From a distance, eastbound drivers on I-80 will see a hazy depiction of the Omaha skyline, a precursor, billboard, or advertisement for their exit onto I-480 North towards downtown Omaha. In closing the gap between image and viewer, the iconographic image of skyline decomposes into the 10,000 representative icons of transportation, with the percentage of each icon type relational to its employment by the people of Omaha. Upon reaching the base, inquisitive drivers and users of the park system will see individual icons ranging in size from one to six inches that represent: 76.7% of Omaha drives alone as a daily mode of transportation 10.5% of Omaha carpools on a daily basis 7.7% of those visiting and returning to Omaha do so by airplane 2.2% of Omaha walk to destinations on a daily basis 1.8% of Omaha employs public transportation as a primary method of transport 0.7% of the people in Omaha use their bikes as a daily method of transportation Less than 1% of the people in Omaha use rail as a method of travel


Corn Rocket (Dream Big) (Stored Potential Two), May 2012

by Maria Hansen

 

Medium: Mural, Mixed Media

Location: Downtown; Grain Silo 3417 Vinton Street Omaha. NE

Owner: Emerging Terrain

Series: Stored Potential Two

Additional Information: The concept for this design is inspired by Midwestern agriculture and how it has shaped our nations capacity to dream big. As a form of transportation, space travel represents the height of human ingenuity. Among the cultural developments bringing us to the space age, agriculture has been especially instrumental. Modern agriculture has brought the proliferation of our food supply, the development of novel chemical compounds, and the advancement of biofuels. While space flight may not play a part in our daily routine, it serves as inspiration for us to reach further with our aspirations and it affirms our ability to succeed. Space exploration has been deeply woven into the narrative of technological progress in post-WWII America. The space race woke the country up to the need for scientists and engineers to be at the head of the world’s innovation curve. The space program, along with other government research laboratories, purchased a large percentage of the early microprocessors, helping push the computer from being an enormous machine that was outside of the reach of all but the wealthiest of individuals, to the point where 85% of Americans own a cellphone. As a country, we overcame the issues of the 20th century with creativity and scientific innovation. Although the Space Shuttle Atlantis completed its final mission on July 21, 2011 and NASA has no firm plans to develop a replacement fleet, we must continue to cultivate the qualities that made the previous century successful.


Design Speed Minimum Radii (Stored Potential Two), May 2012

by Emily Andersen

 

Medium: Mural, Mixed Media

Location: Downtown; Grain Silo 3417 Vinton St. Omaha NE

Owner: Emerging Terrain

Series: Stored Potential Two

Additional Information: ‘Design Speed Minimum Radii’ shows the turning radii of speed. Governed by safety, the geometric road design for interchanges and intersections governs that more speed = larger radii. This graphic overlaps the radii as provided by AASHTO at 7 different speeds. Red lines indicate the minimum turning radii for roads with super-elevation; the sectional tilt of the road surface to counter the centrifigal force of turning at a speed. The curves in cyan show the minimum radii necessary at the same speeds without the super-elevation, which need to be larger without the help of the super-elevation.


Food Miles (Stored Potential Two), May 2012

by MAKE Collaboration

 

Medium: Mural, Mixed Media

Location: Downtown; Grain Silo 3417 Vinton St. Omaha NE

Owner: Emerging Terrain

Series: Stored Potential Two

Additional Information: MAKE Collaboration have focused their banner on the topic of local ‘food miles’ – a term becoming more and more common in conversation, referring to the distance food travels from production to consumer. Given the two banner topics: Lands Use, Food, Agriculture, and Transport(ation), this is an appropriate and poignant merging of them both. They began by asking the question: What is Omaha’s role in global, domestic and local transportation of goods, and more specifically food? Their findings were shocking, yet not surprising: goods that are part of a local movement are transported an average of 56 food miles before they reach their consumer while goods that are not, travel 1,494 food miles (96 percent farther than the former, 4 percent of the latter) (Cited via Checking the food odometer). In order to depict this phenomenon, MAKE utilizes a slice of Omaha from the 2005 Nebraska Land Use Map analysis, represented by circles, as the graphical backbone of their banner image. Only four percent of the circles are highlighted in color to graphically display this outrageous comparison. Simple and direct, this image is both stunningly beautiful and appropriately concerning about our local food system. In addition to addressing ‘food miles’, MAKE also sets an example of ‘bag miles’ with their image. Designed within the banner are tote bag cut-lines to guide the reuse of the banner for local bags. These bags will eventually make a statement by traveling 56 or less ‘bag miles’ to transport their goods.


Google Map (Stored Potential Two), May 2012

by Erica Rowe; Bryan Mohr

 

Medium: Mural, Mixed Media

Location: Downtown; Grain Silo 3417 Vinton St. Omaha NE

Owner: Emerging Terrain

Series: Stored Potential Two

Additional Information: ‘Google Map’ by Erica Rowe and Byran Mohr is a reminder of the domination of technology in our mobility. Using the familiar icons of Google Maps overlaid with a simplified depiction of the Omaha Riverfront Trail, they created their banner as an illustration of the increasing merging of transportation and technology. Erica and Bryan began their explorations for this project by considering how long it had been since either used a printed map to find their way. How outmoded is travel that involves buying a map, asking a stranger for directions, or even just trekking on until discovering the destination and many unexpected discoveries along the way. We now rely on little arrows on a screen to direct our way from A to B, with accuracy and dependability, and perhaps even a shifted perception of space, time, and a visual connection to our mobility based on digital representation. The artists believe Google is, and will continue to be, one of the leading forces in the information transportation revolution–turning our world into a more technologically accessible and interpretive landscape. They point out that it is Google who has driven every inch of the country to bring us ‘street view’ of our very own homes and driveways.


Grey Matter (Stored Potential Two), May 2012

by Brian Hamilton

 

Medium: Mural, Mixed Media

Location: Downtown; Grain Sil0 3417 Vinton St. Omaha NE

Owner: Emerging Terrain

Series: Stored Potential Two

Additional Information: Grey Matter manifests an effort to restructure the perceptual hierarchy of the biological, behavioral, and infrastructural/material patterns that exhibit our existence. Viewed from afar, a defined depiction of a neuron is the predominant feature of the graphic. Upon closer examination, the delineation of the neuron becomes an indistinct figure amidst a dense ground of mapped vectors. These vectors embody a diversity of both corporeal and metaphysical interactions – be it the biologically scripted behavior of social insect colonies, historical human settlement and transportation patterns, or the nodal recursive branching model of digital communication networks. Within the dense environment of Grey Matter, the “natural” and “synthetic” networks mingle. The two-dimensional graphic was generated by bridging several 3d modeling platforms, involving generative simulation and intuitive topological mesh modification to create an aesthetic stability between chaos and coalescence.


Omaha Underground (Stored Potential Two), May 2012

by Geoff DeOld

 

Medium: Mural, Mixed Media

Location: Downtown; Grain Silo 3417 Vinton St. Omaha NE

Owner: Emerging Terrain

Series: Stored Potential Two

Additional Information: “Omaha Underground” imagines a mass transit alternative to the existing automobile dominated transportation infrastructure shaping much of the Omaha landscape, with an underground metro often found in larger metropolitan areas such as London, Beijing, or New York. The proposed layout of distinct subway lines mimics several of the existing transportation corridors servicing the Omaha area, with an emphasis on providing greater connectivity to the first and second rings of suburbs where existing mass transit opportunities are in greater need. Oriented east-west top to bottom with the Missouri River and Council Bluffs at the top of the map, the graphics are contorted, sublimating proportional accuracy for the sake of fitting the banner format and emphasizing Omaha’s east-west direction of growth. Although a subway system is somewhat of a fantastical transit dream for a city the size of Omaha, the notion addresses edges and peripheries and the WHOLE metro region as an interconnected system, as subways often do.


This Blows (Stored Potential Two), May 2012

by Henry Novak

 

Medium: Mural, Mixed Media

Location: Downtown; Grain Silo 3417 Vinton St. Omaha NE

Owner: Emerging Terrain

Series: Stored Potential Two

Additional Information: ‘This Blows’ by 12-year old Omaha native Hank Novak is a simple pen drawing of a dandelion on a vibrant yellow background. Cropped perfectly to interact with the gap in the silos, thus sending the seeds blowing into the Omaha horizon, the image was furthermore a strong jury selection because of Hanks explanatory poem about the innovative movement of dandelion seeds: THIS BLOWS Dandelion seeds Flying everywhere, Helicopters and airplanes Racing in the air. I see car commercials Almost all the time, Their MPG’s are a revolution But sometimes I wonder what Transportation would be like If we did not have evolution.


Time Lapse of Transportation (Stored Potential Two), May 2012

by LeAnn Jensen

 

Medium: Mural, Mixed Media

Location: Downtown; Grain Silo 3417 Vinton St. Omaha NE

Owner: Emerging Terrain

Series: Stored Potential Two

Additional Information: The banner created by Ms. Jensen is intended to highlight the changes in our modes of transportation. It is especially interesting to note how we have gradually adopted transportation methods requiring the burning of fossil fuels. From animal-powered transport, to human-powered devices such as the bicycle, to the steam engine, and finally, the combustion engine. To the artist, it is no great surprise that the use of fossil fuels for transport has been a significant contributor to the altered composition of the Earth’s atmosphere.


Trainscape (Stored Potential Two), May 2012

by Tim Guthrie

 

Medium: Mural, Mixed Media

Location: Downtown; Grain Sile 3417 Vinton St. Omaha, NE

Owner: Emerging Terrain

Series: Stored Potential Two

Additional Information: Tim Guthrie’s train went through many iterations ranging from abstract and conceptual models to representational illustrations. Ultimately, he settled on something more illustrative, but as stripped down and stylized as possible without leaving the image unrecognizable by abandoning the original form. Even though train tracks are generally unbending through most of the midwest, the illustration mimics the curves of some roads and rivers as well as agricultural patterns seen in fields in the Midwest. The title ‘Trainscape’ refers to how the railroad connecting East and West Coasts vastly changed commerce, and revolutionizing the Midwest in profound ways. Rather than focus on a single subject, however, such as early passenger travel, or the current emphasis on agricultural shipping, the train cars are intentionally ambiguous so the viewer can interpret what is being transported. The same is true for the agriculture represented. Although it would have been natural to render fields of corn or soybeans, the crops are stylized so they are equally ambiguous, since Nebraska is connected, via rail, to a region with a diversity of crops.