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Search results for Year: 2010

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....that Hourglass Figure.... , 2010

by Bob Trempe

 

Mediums: Mural, Mixed Media

Location: Downtown; Grain Silo 3417 Vinton Street Omaha, N

Owner: Emerging Terrain

Series: Stored Potential

Additional Information: Perhaps the most simply articulated submission of all, ‘………that Hourglass Figure’ by Bob Trempe, Professor of Architecture at Temple University, was a jury favorite both for its 2D manipulation of a 3D surface, and the method by which he achieves the illusion. Manipulating a convex concrete silo with only an exterior surface is likely a frustrating constraint for an architect. But with a series of simple black dots, Trempe’s submission virtually modifies the geometrical quality of one silo through the draping of a simple gradient pattern. This pattern, designed in the shape of an hourglass, perceptually “tapers” the middle of the silo inward through the patterned shadow image. The pattern of dots creates the shaded quality one would find on a tapered, cylindrical surface. Bob Trempe’s work as an architect and educator focuses on new methods of information visualization and how resultant emergent information can serve as instruction for architectural production. Thought of as the study of process itself, Bob’s works are typically articulated through repetitious systems, exploiting time-based qualities to notate, visualize, and analyze changes-in-state.


80 Feet of Tomatoes , 2010

by Tinca Joyner

 

Mediums: Mural, Mixed Media

Location: Downtown; Grain Silo 3417 Vinton Street

Owner: Emerging Terrain

Series: Stored Potential

Additional Information: A neighbor of the towering grain elevator, 10-year old Tinca Joyner found inspiration for her submission from the plants she cultivates in her own backyard. Both a productive farmer and artist, Tinca has lived in Omaha for all of her 10-year life and has been making art and planting seeds for most of it. The Stored Potential jury found the intersection of these two things especially noteworthy in Joyner’s use of reds and oranges to depict the juicy fruit (or is it a vegetable?) in a style representative of Art Nouveau, especially in its tenet of applying artistic design to everyday utilitarian objects, in order to make beautiful things available to everyone. Although Tinca intended for the tomatoes in her drawing to be oriented to the bottom, as a tomato plant often looks like when supporting large bunches of fruit from a plant that commonly out-produces the needs of the grower, Tinca says the guy at Kinkos accidentally scanned her drawing with the tomatoes to the top. Perhaps he knew that placing the bunch of tomatoes at the top of the elevator would maximize their exposure.


A Molloscock's Inversion of Sky and Sea , 2010

by Tim Guthrie; Maggie Weber

 

Mediums: Mural, Paint

Location: Mid-Town; 6053 Binney Street west side of the Benson Professional Building

Owner: The Professional Building

Series: Benson Mural Project

Additional Information: In 2009, seven people gathered with the common purpose of transforming a portion of Benson’s environment through creative neighborhood projects. After much brainstorming they settled on a public art venture in the form of a mural project. The seven represented Leadership Omaha Class 31, itself a project of the Greater Omaha Chamber of Commerce. The group contacted Benson High School and 12 artists submitted their ideas.


Aerial Production , 2010

by Geoff DeOld; Emily Andersen

 

Mediums: Mural, Mixed Media

Location: Downtown; Grain Silo 3417 Vinton Street Omaha. NE

Owner: Emerging Terrain

Series: Stored Potential

Additional Information: ‘Aerial Production’, by DeOld Andersen Architecture, a partnership between Nebraska natives Emily Andersen and Geoff DeOld, depicts the transformation of the Midwest landscape at the city edge from farmstead to suburban and exurban development. Focusing on a swath of land at the edge of Omaha two miles long by a half mile wide, three different stages of land use are captured simultaneously; productive farmland, former farmland in the process of being re-formed into suburban tract development, and a completed and occupied residential development. This abstracted representation of a literal condition unifies the fits and starts by which land development occurs through a lens of production – land that once produced agricultural crops now produces homes and the infrastructures that support them.


aha-MO , 2010

by Paul Konchagulian

 

Mediums: Steel

Location: Gene Leahy Mall; Gene Leahy Mall, North side of the lagoon between 10th – 13th Street

Owner: City of Omaha

Series: Take A Seat

Additional Information: “aha-Mo!” the prairie individual, welcomes you to the City of Omaha. “aha-Mo!” is sponsored by The Architectural Offices, Paul Konchagulian, Dundee Bank, Werner Paint and Nielsen-Baumert Engineering. This piece is made exclusively of mild plate steel. The three main forms will be welded steel plate. Depth of the piece was achieved by adding sides to the profile of the hand and fingers. The steel was cut to shape with plasma cutter. The steel pieces have Mr. Konchagulian’s trademark stitching. This project is very sustainable. The United States Green Building Council lists steel as the only material which has at least 25% post consumer recycled content. The steel used was donated from the remodeling of Dundee Bank in Omaha. Steel also can be easily recycled when “Take a Seat” has reached the end of its useful life.


Angel of Hope , 2010

by Ortho Fairbanks; Jared Fairbanks

 

Mediums: Bronze

Location: West; Boys Town 13603 Flanagan Blvd.

Owner: Father Flanagans Boys Home

Series: Installments across the country

Additional Information: The Christmas Box Angel of Hope was first introduced to the world in the international best selling book and hit television movie "The Christmas Box," written by Richard Paul Evans. The Original Angel of Hope statue, inspired by the book, was dedicated on December 6, 1994 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Donated by the Compassionate Friends Greater Omaha chapter, this piece is one of 100 identical pieces nationwide. It stands as "a symbol of hope for all parents and loved ones who have experienced the death of a child, not matter what age."


b3nch , 2010

by Brian Kelly; Andrea Kelly

 

Mediums: Steel

Location: Gene Leahy Mall; Gene Leahy Mall Farnam Street side, lower level near the water, east of 13th Street

Owner: City of Omaha (Parks Recreation)

Series: Take A Seat

Additional Information: Donated by ATOMdesign, InfraStructure, KSI Construction, Bender Ornamental and Hunter Painting. The intent was to design a bench that would reflect the energy and dynamics of Downtown Omaha and the Gene Leahy Mall. The operations of folding and cutting plate steel emerged into a series of localized contextual responses. The base of the bench, poised as if ready to jump, gestures toward a machine aesthetic. The seat itself, fabricated from one sheet of plate steel, is cut and folded to create intimate places for conversation and interaction. The entire bench is 3/8” welded, painted plate steel with a center beam support which is 2”x4” painted tube steel. The unit is finished with Sherwin Williams clear anti-graffiti coating.


Bacon , 2010

by M. Brady Clark

 

Mediums: Mural, Mixed Media

Location: Downtown; Grain Silo 3417 Vinton Street Omaha, NE

Owner: Emerging Terrain

Series: Stored Potential

Additional Information: M. Brady Clark’s image is striking, simple, and speaks volumes about the Midwest. Although it isn’t the ‘beef’ Nebraska is most identified with, nor is it condoned by vegetarian friends, it is nonetheless symbolic and representative of the place and certainly the landscape. M. Brady’s ‘Bacon’ is less about specific species of animal, but more about place, consumption, and culture. According to M. Brady, “My work is simply to use my God-given gift to make things better and more beautiful.” Representing Bacon at nearly 80′ tall, on a grain elevator, might be the perfect combination of literal (grain transfer to animal protein) combined with scale to create abstract beauty.


concreAte synergies , 2010

by Brian Kelly

 

Mediums: Mural, Mixed Media

Location: Downtown; Grain Silo 3417 Vinton Street, Omaha, 68105

Owner: Emerging Terrain

Series: Stored Potential

Additional Information: Brian Kelly, an Omaha architect and educator approached his submission as a prime opportunity for initiating dialogue about the issues affecting the population both locally and globally. Rather than attempting to resolve an architectural design problem, he is interested in encouraging an exchange of ideas about the possible reuse of agricultural and industrial relics such as these, and the catalytic change that urban infill can generate. His idea seeks to simultaneously celebrate the silo’s history and suggest a rejuvenation of the edifice that points to a synergetic contemporary culture and its lifestyles. As an architect, educator, and amateur photographer, Brian has a deep fascination with the power of the image and the ability of Montage Theory to create, as Sergei Eisnstein called it, “tertium quid” or third thing. This theory suggests that the assemblage of various, unrelated sequences in a film may be combined to produce a situation where the sum is greater than its parts. In concre(A)te synergies, a series of images of unrelated building components were assembled to create a visual alluding to something outside itself.


Corn as Commodity , 2010

by Jeremy Reding

 

Mediums: Mural, Mixed Media

Location: Downtown; Grain Silo 3417 Vinton Street Omaha, NE

Owner: Emerging Terrain

Series: Stored Potential

Additional Information: Corn is undeniably the heart of the ‘Cornhusker State’. Aside from the moniker of college football where on game days, Memorial Stadium is referred to as the third largest ‘city’ in the state, the seasonal landscape is ruled by the growing cycle of ‘The King Crop’. For Omaha native, Jeremy Reding, his submission not only expresses the importance of the plant to the State of Nebraska but also its role in the transformation of our farms, livestock, grocery stores, and beyond. By conveying the corncob as a scannable barcode, the simple image attempts to connect viewers to corn as a commodity. Viewers can use the scanner on a smartphone and be directed to a website currently being built by Reding that will list the derivatives of the crop, many of which are surprising and will undoubtedly further the conversation about the pervasiveness of corn in our lives, and impact throughout the world.


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