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Search results for Year: 2011

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Chef Boyardee , 2011

by John Lajba

 

Mediums: Bronze

Owner: ConAgra

Additional Information: The task of bringing Chef Boyardee to life fell to Omaha sculptor John Lajba. Chef Boyardee isn't a cartoon or a corporate creation, Lajba said. “He was a human being.” Parents and grandparents might remember when the man himself appeared in most of the brand's television commercials. Hector Boiardi — he went by “Boy-ar-dee” because it was easier for Americans to pronounce — was a hotel chef and restaurateur before he opened a packaged Italian foods company in the 1920s. Boiardi died in 1985 at 87. ConAgra Foods acquired the company in 2000. Lajba used many photos of Boiardi for reference. “He was a man who had a lot of class and a lot of charm.”


Feed Your Brain , 2011

by Stephen Walsh; Ari Rauhauser; Jayme Wyble; Brad Watkins

 

Mediums: Mural, Aerosol

Location: Downtown; W Dale Clark Library 215 S. 15th St. Omaha, NE 68102 North Stairwell

Owner: Omaha Public Library and Kent Bellows Studio

Additional Information: This mural was created as a part of the Urban Arts Program at The Kent Bellows Studio and Center for Visual Art with the support of Paul and Annette Smith, Tod And Betiana Simon Foundation and the Nebraska Humanities Foundation.


Hope , 2011

by James Carpenter

 

Mediums: Steel, Mixed Media, LED Lights

Location: Mid-Town; UNMC Campus, 42nd and Emile It is west of the Harold M. and Beverly Maurer Center for Public Health. It is located on what was formerly 40th Street midway between Dewey Avenue and Emile Street.

Owner: University of Nebraska Medical Center

Additional Information: This piece of art -- which was paid for entirely by private donation -- is part of overall plans for UNMC's academic campus. Omaha philanthropists Ruth and Bill Scott made the lead donation on this piece. The tower – the first artistic piece done by world-renowned artist James Carpenter in Nebraska – is considered a key component in UNMC’s academic campus. The tower was designed to reflect the beautiful effects that occur in the Nebraska sky. It combines stainless steel and natural light to embody UNMC’s scientific character and the transient qualities of Nebraska’s skies. If it’s a bright sunny day, it will appear to shimmer. At dusk, it will reflect the variety of colors that are in the sky. In many places in Nebraska, the clouds and sky seem to merge with the ground and Carpenter wanted to capture that effect with the piece.


Rock Paper Scissors , 2011

by Kevin Box; Warren Cullar

 

Mediums: Bronze

Location: Mid-Town; UNMC Campus, 42nd and Emile Located on the Ruth and Bill Scott Student Plaza on the UNMC campus (east of 42nd Street between Dewey and Emile)

Owner: University of Nebraska Medical Center

Additional Information: This piece is a gift from Dr. Jim and Karen Linder. The artists who collaborated on this piece describe the decision making game we all have played at one time or another. The rock and scissors are created by Warren Cullar and the paper was created by Kevin Box.


Steel Watercolor Blue Arc , 2011

by Fletcher Benton

 

Mediums: Steel, Paint

Location: Mid-Town; UNMC Campus, 519 S. 40th Plaza Circle It is south of the Harold M. and Beverly Maurer Center for Public Health on the student plaza

Owner: Owned by the International Sculpture Center, on loan from Kaneko

Additional Information: Fletcher Benton’s fascination with letters and numbers became the inspiration for a major series of work that began in the 1970’s. Benton’s stunning variations on familiar themes present a wealth of possibilities, invention worthy of a great composer. Fletcher Benton was recognized in 2008 by the International Sculpture Center with a Lifetime Achievement Award.


The Letter Q , 2011

by Fletcher Benton

 

Mediums: Steel, Paint

Location: Mid-Town; UNMC Campus, 519 S. 40th Plaza Circle It is south of the Harold M. and Beverly Maurer Center for Public Health on the student plaza

Owner: University of Nebraska Medical Center

Series: Fletcher Benton The Alphabet

Additional Information: This piece was donated to UNMC by Fred and Eve Simon. Fletcher Benton is well known for his large metal sculptures, many of which seem to defy gravity in their precariously balanced forms. At the same time, his early career as a commercial sign painter led him to an appreciation for the purity of the Roman alphabet and inspired him to create his own set of letters and numbers. These pieces can be found across the country.


The Picnic Table , 2011

by Michael Beitz

 

Mediums: Wood, Paint

Location: Downtown; NW Corner 12th & Leavenworth - Bemis dock

Owner: Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts


Vessel , 2011

by Les Bruning

 

Mediums: Stainless Steel, LED Lights

Location: Mid-Town; 1919 Aksarben Drive. Located n the NE corner of Aksarben Dr and Frances St.

Owner: Blue Cross Blue Shield of Nebraska

Additional Information: It's a faintly V-shaped piece and has cutouts swirling around the metal exterior. Its center section glows a vibrant neon blue when darkness sets. Bruning said the shape of the piece is loosely based on the familiar medical symbol of two snakes swirling around the central staff." "The cutouts on the piece mostly deal with ecological issues and man's relationship with nature: endangered sturgeon fish swim around the base, men swim around the middle, and eagles and hawks fly around the top. Vessel uses the basic form of a vessel as a metaphor for the sum of ones life and experiences. Both on the interior spiral ribbons and in the exterior skin, there are repeating patterns of pallid sturgeons, human swimmers and hawks and eagles. In our cycle of life the see our species endangering the pallid sturgeons that enhabit the Missouri River. The human swimmers represent man in the immediate balance with nature and the hawks and eagles are thriving survivors of decades ago abuse of pesticides. The cut out forms create an ephermal quality in which we sometimes see the interior forms and at other times the lighting conditions only allow us to real the images on the skin. At night the interior lighting creates a blue glow.


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