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Search results for Medium: Granite

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(Baseball Player) , 1927

by Unknown

 

Mediums: Granite

Location: Mid-Town; Elmwood Park 68th and Leavenworth 100 yards North of the Grotto and 100 yards to the East of the Pavilion in the Park

Owner: City of Omaha

Additional Information: This baseball player, dubbed Bosco by some who didn’t appreciate his lack of style and grace, was atop a pedestal in Elmwood Park. Bocso was bronze and with the base, cost the Omaha Amateur Baseball Association $3500.00 in 1927. Made in a Chicago foundry, Bosco was dedicated in a ceremony in which a little girl doused him with a bottle of Elmwood spring water. The site for Bosco is adjacent to the Grotto (which had spring water) in Elmwood Park. Bosco remained on site until 1942 when he was dumped on a scrap-metal pile at 11th & Jackson streets during a collection campaign for “scrap metal for the war” (started by the Omaha World-Herald). A group of Central High School students freed Bosco with crowbars and wrenches and delivered him by truck to the collection site. There has been discussion over the years about replacing Bosco atop the remaining pedestal.


(Double Sided Settee - A Trio) , 1983

by Scott Burton

 

Mediums: Granite

Location: Joslyn; Joslyn Art Museum Sculpture Garden 2200 Dodge Street

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Additional Information: Scott Burton’s functional sculptures, which require the spectator’s presence to complete their purpose, transformed the idea of public art. Burton often infused the plain abstract forms of Minimalism with a sense of utility, history, and wit, creating sculptures that could be used as tables and chairs when not on exhibit. His simple forms, cut from smooth and sometimes jagged pieces of granite, can be found with people sitting on them in several cities. Funded with a National Endowment for the Arts, Art in Public Places grant of $22,000 given in 1981 to the Joslyn Art Museum.


Ex-POW Monument , 2009

by Carl Weiss

 

Mediums: Granite

Location: Mid-Town; Memorial Park, 60th & Underwood Avenue

Owner: City of Omaha

Additional Information: The Monument is dedicated to the men and women who served their country with great pride and had the misfortune to be prisoners of war. The Monument is made of black granite with a rough cut back and polished front. The black granite represents the black ribbon flanked by red, white and blue from which the ex-POW’s medal hangs. The rough cut represents the harshness and despair the POW’s were subject to in captivity. The polished front has an explanation of the monument. At the top of the polished front is a cast bronze replica of the medal awarded to the ex-POW. Below are the 5 branches of the service, cast in aluminum.


Sullivan's Passage , 1980

by George Trakas

 

Mediums: Steel, Granite

Location: Downtown; In front of the Omaha Opportunities Industrial Center (OOIC) Building 2724 N. 24th St.

Owner: Omaha Opportunities and Industrialization Center


The Omaha Riverscape , 2008-09

by Jesus Moroles

 

Mediums: Granite, Stone, Water

Location: Joslyn; Joslyn Art Museum Sculpture Garden 2200 Dodge Street

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Additional Information: Moroles’ work reflects the ideas of eternity, stability, and longevity. “The stone itself is the starting point, and I feel a connection to it,” he said, adding that he aims to “make the stone important by drawing attention to it and to show the finished pieces as a result of an interaction between man and nature.” Moroles chooses pieces that can retain a suggestion of their original formation after he has worked on them. He does not use plans or drawings, but rather allows the stone’s veins, colors, and textures to guide him. In a process he calls “tearing granite,” Moroles gradually cracks the stone with “wedges” and “feathers,” never completely sure of the results but always pursuing his masterpiece. He always stops his work at the moment it reaches the fine line between natural and manmade. Certain forms appear again and again in Moroles work—the totem, obelisk, and stele—reflecting similar monuments erected since prehistoric times around the world. Some of his innovations in granite include pieces, such as the Broken Earth water wall that is part of the Joslyn installation, that appear woven into a fabric. The Joslyn museum purchased this piece with funds from the Patron Circle for Contemporary Art and Ted and Helen Kolderie, 2009.


Unknown

by Unknown

 

Mediums: Granite

Location: Mid-Town; Central High School 124 North 20th Street In front of main entrance

Owner: Omaha Public Schools


Untitled , 1991

by John Lajba

 

Mediums: Bronze, Granite

Location: Downtown; In shopping mall at 33rd and L near the north end, in front of a beauty supply store.

Owner: Dial R.E.I.T

Additional Information: Commemorating the meat packing industry in South Omaha.


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