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....that Hourglass Figure.... , 2010

by Bob Trempe

 

Mediums: Mural, Mixed Media

Location: Downtown; Grain Silo 3417 Vinton Street Omaha, N

Owner: Emerging Terrain

Series: Stored Potential

Additional Information: Perhaps the most simply articulated submission of all, ‘………that Hourglass Figure’ by Bob Trempe, Professor of Architecture at Temple University, was a jury favorite both for its 2D manipulation of a 3D surface, and the method by which he achieves the illusion. Manipulating a convex concrete silo with only an exterior surface is likely a frustrating constraint for an architect. But with a series of simple black dots, Trempe’s submission virtually modifies the geometrical quality of one silo through the draping of a simple gradient pattern. This pattern, designed in the shape of an hourglass, perceptually “tapers” the middle of the silo inward through the patterned shadow image. The pattern of dots creates the shaded quality one would find on a tapered, cylindrical surface. Bob Trempe’s work as an architect and educator focuses on new methods of information visualization and how resultant emergent information can serve as instruction for architectural production. Thought of as the study of process itself, Bob’s works are typically articulated through repetitious systems, exploiting time-based qualities to notate, visualize, and analyze changes-in-state.


80 Feet of Tomatoes , 2010

by Tinca Joyner

 

Mediums: Mural, Mixed Media

Location: Downtown; Grain Silo 3417 Vinton Street

Owner: Emerging Terrain

Series: Stored Potential

Additional Information: A neighbor of the towering grain elevator, 10-year old Tinca Joyner found inspiration for her submission from the plants she cultivates in her own backyard. Both a productive farmer and artist, Tinca has lived in Omaha for all of her 10-year life and has been making art and planting seeds for most of it. The Stored Potential jury found the intersection of these two things especially noteworthy in Joyner’s use of reds and oranges to depict the juicy fruit (or is it a vegetable?) in a style representative of Art Nouveau, especially in its tenet of applying artistic design to everyday utilitarian objects, in order to make beautiful things available to everyone. Although Tinca intended for the tomatoes in her drawing to be oriented to the bottom, as a tomato plant often looks like when supporting large bunches of fruit from a plant that commonly out-produces the needs of the grower, Tinca says the guy at Kinkos accidentally scanned her drawing with the tomatoes to the top. Perhaps he knew that placing the bunch of tomatoes at the top of the elevator would maximize their exposure.


A Friendly Reminder , May 2012

by Ashley Byars; Bill DeRoin

 

Mediums: Mural, Mixed Media

Location: Downtown; Grain silo 3417 Vinton St. Omaha NE

Owner: Emerging Terrain

Series: Stored Potential Two

Additional Information: ‘A Friendly Reminder’ by architectural designers Ashley Byars and Bill DeRoin seeks to graphically illustrate the gasoline consumption of an average daily Omaha commute. The purpose of the banner is not to incite or inflame, but to make visible something not typical seen. As suggested by the common phase “A picture is worth 1000 words”, seeing a statistic graphically can be more profound then reading it. Bill and Ashley hope the illustration encourages discussion about fuel consumption, commuting, and transportation in Omaha. The banner attempts to answer the question: “How much of a silo would be filled with all the gas used in Omaha’s typical daily commute?” The quickest place to start was determining the volume capacity of a single grain elevator. For the sake of simplicity, the silos were perceived as perfectly hollow cylinders with thin exterior walls and an average dimension of 12.5’ radius and 101’ height. With these dimensions the volume (V=[pi]R^2 x H) was calculated to be 49,553 cubic feet. The next (and more difficult) calculation to find was a quantifiable value for how much gasoline Omaha commuters use on a daily basis. Employing various methods including online resources and actually driving typical commute routes, the following criteria was determined: No. of Omaha Passenger Vehicle Commuters = 273,936 (1) Average Passenger Vehicle Fuel Efficiency = 21 mpg (2) Average Omaha Commuting Time = 17.3 Minutes (3) Average Omaha Commuting Distance = 13.3 miles 273,936 commuters x 13.3miles / 21 mpg and reached the value of 172,188 gallons, or 23,018 cubic feet. This volume was placed into the elevator volume capacity, and resulted in a final value of the daily gasoline consumption equaling roughly 46.5% capacity of a typical silo.


A Panoramic Rendering of the Journey of Discovery , 2004

by John Thein; John Mossman

 

Mediums: Ceramic

Location: Downtown; Miller’s Landing 151 Freedom Park Road

Owner: City of Omaha

Series: Lewis & Clark Icon Sculpture Project

Additional Information: “A Panoramic Rendering of the Journey of Discovery is a six-piece Icon sculpture—one of nine Icons located in Nebraska and Iowa along the Missouri River. The sculptures feature artistic interpretations of the Corps of Discovery Expedition to explain the River’s story and existing culture of this area. The Icon sculpture is easily visible to visitors on the trail. The Icon form is concrete with a space designated for artist embellishment.


Abstract Fountain , 1986

by Rod Kagan

 

Mediums: Metal, Water

Location: Downtown; 2200 Abbott, next to the Info Group Office Building

Owner: Owen Industires

Additional Information: The water moves from the top down through the angled U channel iron pieces.


Aerial Production , 2010

by Geoff DeOld; Emily Andersen

 

Mediums: Mural, Mixed Media

Location: Downtown; Grain Silo 3417 Vinton Street Omaha. NE

Owner: Emerging Terrain

Series: Stored Potential

Additional Information: ‘Aerial Production’, by DeOld Andersen Architecture, a partnership between Nebraska natives Emily Andersen and Geoff DeOld, depicts the transformation of the Midwest landscape at the city edge from farmstead to suburban and exurban development. Focusing on a swath of land at the edge of Omaha two miles long by a half mile wide, three different stages of land use are captured simultaneously; productive farmland, former farmland in the process of being re-formed into suburban tract development, and a completed and occupied residential development. This abstracted representation of a literal condition unifies the fits and starts by which land development occurs through a lens of production – land that once produced agricultural crops now produces homes and the infrastructures that support them.


Airbourne Monument , 2007

by Matthew J. Placzek

 

Mediums: Bronze

Location: Downtown; Adjacent to the World War II Monument and lake at Heartland of America Park, 8th & Douglas Streets

Owner: City of Omaha

Additional Information: The Heartland Airborne Memorial is a testimonial to the persistence, patience, tireless work and vision of Airborne veterans in our community who stayed the course in completing their mission and to the many benefactors who donated to the campaign.


Ant Trails , May 2012

by Bethany Kalk

 

Mediums: Mural, Mixed Media

Location: Downtown; Grain Silo 3417 Vinton St. Omaha NE

Owner: Emerging Terrain

Series: Stored Potential Two

Additional Information: By intertwining the networks of constructed roadways in Omaha with ‘transport’ formations produced by insects – ant trails and bee honeycombs – Ant Trails is a visualization of the similarity and interconnection between human and natural realms of movement. It is always interesting to find out how submission ideas come into being; while Bethany was pondering her entry, she was babysitting her nieces and took them on a walk. They were overturning rocks on a hunt for insects to lessen their fear of “bugs.” Under many rocks were ant trails and the correlation became obvious; ants and humans transport food (and goods) with similar methods of networked systems. The honeycomb form of ‘food storage’ layers yet another important process into the overall image and idea. All these networks represented here at the same scale blurs the hierarchy of our often competing worlds and renders them equal in importance.


Around The Bend (This Exit) , May 2012

by Bob Trempe

 

Mediums: Mural, Mixed Media

Location: Downtown; Grain Silo 3417 Vinton St. Omaha NE

Owner: Emerging Terrain

Series: Stored Potential Two

Additional Information: ‘Around the Bend (This Exit)’ employs statistical information as an organizational strategy towards a trans-formative image, a composition that morphs from an iconic image of the Omaha city skyline to over 10,000 icons depicting transportation usage in Omaha. From a distance, eastbound drivers on I-80 will see a hazy depiction of the Omaha skyline, a precursor, billboard, or advertisement for their exit onto I-480 North towards downtown Omaha. In closing the gap between image and viewer, the iconographic image of skyline decomposes into the 10,000 representative icons of transportation, with the percentage of each icon type relational to its employment by the people of Omaha. Upon reaching the base, inquisitive drivers and users of the park system will see individual icons ranging in size from one to six inches that represent: 76.7% of Omaha drives alone as a daily mode of transportation 10.5% of Omaha carpools on a daily basis 7.7% of those visiting and returning to Omaha do so by airplane 2.2% of Omaha walk to destinations on a daily basis 1.8% of Omaha employs public transportation as a primary method of transport 0.7% of the people in Omaha use their bikes as a daily method of transportation Less than 1% of the people in Omaha use rail as a method of travel


Art is not Communication. It is Dialogue. , 2005

by Linda Miegs

 

Mediums: Wood, Paint

Location: Downtown; SE corner of the Florence Mill 9102 N 30th Street

Owner: Sponsored by Kiwanis Club of Florence

Series: Bench Marks

Additional Information: This was part of the 2005-2006 Bench Marks project. The project was a collaboration of artists, writers, and organizations that support and encourage an active, healthy and involved community.


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