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Metamorphosis

by Bernard Matemera

 

Mediums: Stone

Location: Joslyn; Joslyn Art Museum Discovery Sculpture Garden 2200 Dodge St.

Owner: Joslyn Art Mueum

Additional Information: Bernard Matemera, one of Zimbabwe's master sculptors, was a founding member of the Shona Tengenenge Sculpture Village. A prolific sculptor, he creates powerful works of strong African imagery and subject matter. Matemera's sculptures are the subject of his dreams: animals, spirits, people, and creatures and the ever-present metamorphosis between them. His African neo-expressionism is often represented in enormous and deliberately grotesque dimensions, oscillating between the humorous and the tragic. Matemera is consistently faithful to his beliefs and sense of pride in his country with its inherited cultural and spiritual ancestry. This piece was a gift the the Joslym Museum in 2007 by Richard and Frances Juro


Moment , 2009

by Albert Paley

 

Mediums: Steel

Location: Downtown, Joslyn; Joslyn Art Museum Sculpture Garden 2200 Dodge St.

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Additional Information: Albert Paley has been heralded for his inventive approach to form development and metal technique in his large-scale sculpture. The site-specific metal assemblages Paley has created over the past three decades place him not only in the forefront of contemporary sculpture but also in the vanguard of artists working in the new, genre-defying area that has been called “Archisculpture.” His inclusion in this group is due to his skill in merging boundaries between the two disciplines and his innovative experiments with environmental and formal considerations. On loan from by Gerald Peters Gallery, Santa Fe, 2010


Oedipus at Colonnus , 1968

by Leonard Baskin

 

Mediums: Bronze

Location: Joslyn; Joslyn Art Museum Sculpture Garden 2200 Dodge St.

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Additional Information: Leonard Baskin considered his sculptures ”memorials to ordinary human beings, gigantic monuments to the unnoticed dead: the exhausted factory worker, the forgotten tailor, the unsung poet . . . . Sculpture at its greatest and most monumental is about simple, abstract, emotional states, like fear, pride, love and envy .” Oedipus at Colonus (spelled differently in the title of the sculpture) is one of the three Theban plays of the Athenian tragedian Sophocles. The play describes the end of the blinded Oedipus’ tragic life, said to have occurred at Colonus, a village near Athens and Sophocles’ own birthplace. Gift of Lawrence Fleischman, 1980


One of the Burghers of Calais: Andrieu d’Andres , ca 1884

by Auguste Rodin

 

Mediums: Bronze

Location: Joslyn; Joslyn Museum Sculpture Garden 2200 Dodge St.

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Additional Information: This figure is from Rodin’s monument titled The Burghers of Calais commemorating the surrender of the besieged French city of Calais to English King Edward III in 1347. With the people desperately short of food and water, six of the leading citizens, or burghers, of Calais offered themselves as hostages to Edward in exchange for the freedom of their city. The king agreed, ordering them to dress in plain garments, wear nooses around their necks, and journey to his camp bearing the keys to the city. Although the king intended to kill the burghers, his pregnant wife, Philippa, persuaded him to spare them, believing that their deaths would be a bad omen for her unborn child. Andrieu d’Andres was among the six burghers who offered themselves as hostages. Expecting death, his pose and gesture express anguish and desperation. In this sculpture, Rodin deftly captures a moment poignant with a mix of defeat and heroic self-sacrifice. His characteristic modeling style, leaving shadowy hollows and gleaming ridges, perfectly describes the figure’s emaciated physique. Gift of John and Carmen Gottschalk and G. Woodson and Anda Howe, 2002


Pawn , ca. 1980

by Sidney Buchanan

 

Mediums: Steel

Location: Joslyn; Joslyn Art Museum Sculpture Garden 2200 Dodge St.

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Additional Information: Sidney Buchanan is perhaps the best known Nebraska artist working in welded metal sculpture. A former professor of sculpture at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, Buchanan’s monumental, imposing public art is on view throughout Omaha. His reconstructed found-art sculptures are shaped from junkyard pieces of steel — 1950s auto bumpers, chunks of locomotives and boilers, and twisted beams from demolished buildings. This piece was a gift to the Joslyn museum by Philip J. Willson in 2008.


Pencil Bench , 2009

by Ron Parks

 

Mediums: Stainless Steel

Location: Joslyn; Joslyn Art Museum Discovery Sculpture Garden 2200 Dodge Street

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Additional Information: Omaha artist Ron Parks is applies to the creative process the knowledge and experience gained from a 30-year career of inventing, designing, and fabricating in metals. Fusing the fabricated with the natural, each piece invites the viewer to join in by teasing one’s sense of reality. Light strikes angle and veers off; shadow glides along curve; imagination blends with craftsmanship. The Joslyn museum purchased this piece with funds provided by Dr. and Mrs. Stanley Truhlsen.


Sioux Warrior , 1935

by John David Brcin; Matthew J. Placzek

 

Mediums: Bronze

Location: Joslyn; Joslyn Art Museum Sculpture Garden 2200 Dodge St.

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Additional Information: Serbian-born sculptor John David Brcin was commissioned by architects John and Alan McDonald to create the sculptural panels adorning the four corners of the Joslyn building. This statue of a Sioux warrior, originally proposed and modeled by Brcin in the late 1920s for the entrance to the Museum, was ultimately deleted from the sculptural program in favor of a less decorated approach to the building. In 2008 Omaha sculptor Matthew Placzek was commissioned to realize Brcin’s work for Joslyn’s new sculpture garden.


Spirit of the Dance , 1932

by William Zorach

 

Mediums: Bronze

Location: Joslyn; Joslyn Art Museum Sculpture Garden 2200 Dodge St.

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Additional Information: Spirit of the Dance expresses an important concept in Zorach’s oeuvre: rhythm. In his sculpture, rhythm arises from the interrelationship of forms, the most basic of which is composed of a curve, a straight line, and a reverse curve. According to Zorach, rhythm is “continuity—flow—an untiring, non-monotonous movement . . . a quality without which any art is lifeless and dead.” He felt that rhythm was manifested most strongly in dance. In Spirit of the Dance a simply rhythmic pattern can be seen in the curve of the head and neck that joins with the straight line of the upright torso, which in turn is connected to the reverse curve of the buttocks and thigh. On loan by by the University of Nebraska at Omaha, 1974


Story-Telling Hut , 2009

by Patrick Dougherty

 

Mediums: Wood

Location: Joslyn; Joslyn Art Museum Discovery Sculpture Garden 2200 Dodge Street

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Additional Information: An internationally known sculptor of large-scale, site specific, temporary sculptures made from indigenous materials, Dougherty creates monumental environments by interweaving branches and twigs, without any outside means of attachment. His works allude to nests, cocoons, hives, and lairs built by animals, as well as the manmade forms of huts, haystacks, and baskets. He intentionally creates each work of art to look “found” rather than made, as if it has just fallen into or grown up naturally in its setting. Each work takes three to four weeks to construct and gradually disintegrates over a period of 18 to 24 months. The Joslyn installation is a circular structure in the shape of the letters Y-O-U-R S-T-O-R-Y. The Joslyn museum purchased this piece with funds provided by Dr. and Mrs. Stanley Truhlsen.


The Omaha Riverscape , 2008-09

by Jesus Moroles

 

Mediums: Granite, Stone, Water

Location: Joslyn; Joslyn Art Museum Sculpture Garden 2200 Dodge Street

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Additional Information: Moroles’ work reflects the ideas of eternity, stability, and longevity. “The stone itself is the starting point, and I feel a connection to it,” he said, adding that he aims to “make the stone important by drawing attention to it and to show the finished pieces as a result of an interaction between man and nature.” Moroles chooses pieces that can retain a suggestion of their original formation after he has worked on them. He does not use plans or drawings, but rather allows the stone’s veins, colors, and textures to guide him. In a process he calls “tearing granite,” Moroles gradually cracks the stone with “wedges” and “feathers,” never completely sure of the results but always pursuing his masterpiece. He always stops his work at the moment it reaches the fine line between natural and manmade. Certain forms appear again and again in Moroles work—the totem, obelisk, and stele—reflecting similar monuments erected since prehistoric times around the world. Some of his innovations in granite include pieces, such as the Broken Earth water wall that is part of the Joslyn installation, that appear woven into a fabric. The Joslyn museum purchased this piece with funds from the Patron Circle for Contemporary Art and Ted and Helen Kolderie, 2009.


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