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Ceres , 1986

by Sidney Buchanan

 

Mediums: Steel

Location: Downtown; Elliot Aviation 3636 Wilbur Plaza 150 feet to the NW of the intersection of Wilbur Plaza and Lindbergh Plaza.

Owner: Omaha Airport Authority


concreAte synergies , 2010

by Brian Kelly

 

Mediums: Mural, Mixed Media

Location: Downtown; Grain Silo 3417 Vinton Street, Omaha, 68105

Owner: Emerging Terrain

Series: Stored Potential

Additional Information: Brian Kelly, an Omaha architect and educator approached his submission as a prime opportunity for initiating dialogue about the issues affecting the population both locally and globally. Rather than attempting to resolve an architectural design problem, he is interested in encouraging an exchange of ideas about the possible reuse of agricultural and industrial relics such as these, and the catalytic change that urban infill can generate. His idea seeks to simultaneously celebrate the silo’s history and suggest a rejuvenation of the edifice that points to a synergetic contemporary culture and its lifestyles. As an architect, educator, and amateur photographer, Brian has a deep fascination with the power of the image and the ability of Montage Theory to create, as Sergei Eisnstein called it, “tertium quid” or third thing. This theory suggests that the assemblage of various, unrelated sequences in a film may be combined to produce a situation where the sum is greater than its parts. In concre(A)te synergies, a series of images of unrelated building components were assembled to create a visual alluding to something outside itself.


Conestoga School , 1992

by John Himmelfarb

 

Mediums: Ceramic, Acrylic

Location: Downtown; Conestoga School 2115 Burdette St. on the North face of the school building directly to the east of the entrance.

Owner: Omaha Public Schools


Corn as Commodity , 2010

by Jeremy Reding

 

Mediums: Mural, Mixed Media

Location: Downtown; Grain Silo 3417 Vinton Street Omaha, NE

Owner: Emerging Terrain

Series: Stored Potential

Additional Information: Corn is undeniably the heart of the ‘Cornhusker State’. Aside from the moniker of college football where on game days, Memorial Stadium is referred to as the third largest ‘city’ in the state, the seasonal landscape is ruled by the growing cycle of ‘The King Crop’. For Omaha native, Jeremy Reding, his submission not only expresses the importance of the plant to the State of Nebraska but also its role in the transformation of our farms, livestock, grocery stores, and beyond. By conveying the corncob as a scannable barcode, the simple image attempts to connect viewers to corn as a commodity. Viewers can use the scanner on a smartphone and be directed to a website currently being built by Reding that will list the derivatives of the crop, many of which are surprising and will undoubtedly further the conversation about the pervasiveness of corn in our lives, and impact throughout the world.


Corn Cob , 2010

by Mary Day

 

Mediums: Mural, Mixed Media

Location: Downtown; Grain Silo 3417 Vinton St. Omaha, NE

Owner: Emerging Terrain

Series: Stored Potential

Additional Information: Omaha artist Mary Day scanned an ear of corn for what she calls a ‘cliche’; to be in Nebraska is to be surrounded by corn, literally and figuratively. And the image of the corn cob is a most obvious recall of the identity and function of the grain elevator as a structure that originally stored the grain. But Mary’s scan lead her to a submission that is anything but cliche, and rather a re-composition of an iconic symbol of farmland in Nebraska and the Midwest, based on an implicitly recurring unit of measure. A corn kernel to a corn row to a corn cob to the rows of corn to the fields of corn is an exponentially increasing unit of measure. Mary used her scanned ear of corn as the structural equivalent of “mathematical” divisions in the picture plane, similar to those that strike her each time she flies over the Omaha landscape. The conceptualization of the rows of kernels parallel the larger concept of rows of corn in the field to fields of corn in the landscape, and so on. Breaking the corn cob into informational lines which converge back to an image of corn parallels the artistic process of contextualizing images into information. The handmade mark is important to the concept because it is a visceral response to visually perceived information. Drawing is about the connection of head to heart to hand. The finished drawing on the silo shows the gestural mark held within the structural division of the corn cob. The drawing of the corn cob into informational bits is an equivalent for patterns perceived from an airplane, or Google earth, or NASA satellite photos.


Corn Rocket (Dream Big) , May 2012

by Maria Hansen

 

Mediums: Mural, Mixed Media

Location: Downtown; Grain Silo 3417 Vinton Street Omaha. NE

Owner: Emerging Terrain

Series: Stored Potential Two

Additional Information: The concept for this design is inspired by Midwestern agriculture and how it has shaped our nations capacity to dream big. As a form of transportation, space travel represents the height of human ingenuity. Among the cultural developments bringing us to the space age, agriculture has been especially instrumental. Modern agriculture has brought the proliferation of our food supply, the development of novel chemical compounds, and the advancement of biofuels. While space flight may not play a part in our daily routine, it serves as inspiration for us to reach further with our aspirations and it affirms our ability to succeed. Space exploration has been deeply woven into the narrative of technological progress in post-WWII America. The space race woke the country up to the need for scientists and engineers to be at the head of the world’s innovation curve. The space program, along with other government research laboratories, purchased a large percentage of the early microprocessors, helping push the computer from being an enormous machine that was outside of the reach of all but the wealthiest of individuals, to the point where 85% of Americans own a cellphone. As a country, we overcame the issues of the 20th century with creativity and scientific innovation. Although the Space Shuttle Atlantis completed its final mission on July 21, 2011 and NASA has no firm plans to develop a replacement fleet, we must continue to cultivate the qualities that made the previous century successful.


Cultivator , 2010

by Matthew Rezac

 

Mediums: Mural, Mixed Media

Location: Downtown; Grain Silo 3417 Vinton Street

Owner: Emerging Terrain

Series: Stored Potential

Additional Information: For pastel artist Matthew Rezac, who grew up near Bennington, Nebraska, a suburbanizing town northwest of Omaha, the Stored Potential project provoked this reflection on the intimacy between tool, farmer, land, and family. To the Stored Potential jury, Matthew’s drawing of a simple cultivator took on the quality and scale of infrastructure when sized equal to the elevator and juxtaposed with the adjacent freeway.


Dance of the Cranes , 1988

by John Richard Raimondi

 

Mediums: Metal

Location: Downtown; Epply Airport, 4501 Abbott Dr.

Owner: Omaha Airport Authority


Design Speed Minimum Radii , May 2012

by Emily Andersen

 

Mediums: Mural, Mixed Media

Location: Downtown; Grain Silo 3417 Vinton St. Omaha NE

Owner: Emerging Terrain

Series: Stored Potential Two

Additional Information: ‘Design Speed Minimum Radii’ shows the turning radii of speed. Governed by safety, the geometric road design for interchanges and intersections governs that more speed = larger radii. This graphic overlaps the radii as provided by AASHTO at 7 different speeds. Red lines indicate the minimum turning radii for roads with super-elevation; the sectional tilt of the road surface to counter the centrifigal force of turning at a speed. The curves in cyan show the minimum radii necessary at the same speeds without the super-elevation, which need to be larger without the help of the super-elevation.


Diminishing Returns , 2010

by Scott Keyes

 

Mediums: Mural, Mixed Media

Location: Downtown; Grain Silo 3417 Vinton Street Omaha, NE

Owner: Emerging Terrain

Series: Stored Potential

Additional Information: Hidden underground, the alarming depletion of the Ogallala Aquifer literally lacks visibility. When California native, Scott Keyes, began doing research for his Stored Potential submission and for the first time learned of the diminishing Ogallala Aquifer, he saw the potential to make this hidden resource visible. By taking advantage of the silo’s enormous height to create a 1:1 scale model of well 5N 40W28CDA, a groundwater irrigation unit located in Chase County, Nebraska, Keyes creates a tangible snapshot of the region’s precarious relationship to its most invaluable natural resource. Using USGS data gathered since 1970, historical water levels within the well are marked at five year intervals along the silo’s interior – the walls that once contained the commodity created by confluence of sun energy and underground water. The jury agreed that by rendering this important water issue visible, this submission represents a byproduct of the region’s agricultural legacy which is as real and concrete as the abandoned silos on which it is situated.


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