Public Art OmahaAboutGet InvolvedPublic ArtArtistsGalleries/MuseumsLinksContact
 

Search Results

Search results for Area: Joslyn

21-23 of 23 results. Page: «  1 | 2 | 3


Hide Map of Results

Untitled , 1981

by John Henry

 

Mediums: Steel

Location: Joslyn; Joslyn Art Museum Sculpture Garden 2200 Dodge St.

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Additional Information: John Henry is known worldwide for his public works of art, which range in size from small tabletop pieces to some of the largest contemporary metal sculptures in the world. While identified by some in the 1970s as part of the Minimalist movement, the geometric forms that have defined Henry’s work for more than forty years have their aesthetic and historical base in Constructivism. He has a supreme commitment to the materiality of his work and an unwavering insistence on maintaining the integrity of the process and the materials in developing his visual vocabulary. This piece was a gift from the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company in 1991.


Untitled , 2005

by Jun Kaneko

 

Mediums: Ceramic

Location: Joslyn; Joslyn Art Museum Sculpture Garden 2200 Dodge St.

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Additional Information: Recognized for his high, rounded, monolithic glazed forms known as dangos (Japanese for dumpling), Kaneko has refined a technique for creating what might possibly be the largest ceramic sculptures ever made, setting him apart from all other ceramists. Even larger than his dangos are his human head forms, three of which were on view in 2008 on New York City’s Park Avenue Malls. Joslyn’s work is one of Kaneko’s human head forms. The Joslyn museum purchased this piece with funds provided by Cathy and Troy Perry, Susan and A. J. Thomas, and Jan and Charles Vrana in memory of Jacqueline and Ernest Vrana, 2009.


Yellow Ascending , 1977

by George Sugarman

 

Mediums: Steel

Location: Joslyn; Near parking lot Joslyn Museum 2200 Dodge St.

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Additional Information: George Sugarman is associated with both the revival of large-scale outdoor sculpture in the late 1960s and the decorative movement in the 1970s. Innovative at the time in the use of color in his sculpture, Sugarman showed how color as well as form could define space in an abstract way. Turning his interest to large outdoor sculptures, Sugarman used sheets of steel to create complex metal works, overlapping and welding together flat cutouts to enclose a volume that looked like a leafy arbor or created an open, airy configuration. An outstanding example of Sugarman’s ability to translate his love of movement, color, and structure into a monumental metal sculpture, Yellow Ascending seems to rise weightlessly from the ground, like leaves tossed into the air. The Joslyn museum purchased this piece in honor of Leo A. Daly in 1983.


21-23 of 23 results. Page: «  1 | 2 | 3