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Search results for Owner: City of Omaha

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Makimono , 2010

by RDG Planning

 

Mediums: Stainless Steel

Location: Gene Leahy Mall; Gene Leahy Mall, lower level near the water, east of 10th Street

Owner: City of Omaha (Parks Recreation)

Series: Take A Seat

Additional Information: Donated by RDG Planning & Design and Paxton & Vierling Steel. Our bench is made up of four individually rolled, laser cut, bead-blasted stainless steel sheets. These sheets are then fully welded and ground smooth at the seam to create an elliptical shape in section. These sections are then anchored to concrete pilings beneath the plaza by bolted connections. The four benches were designed and fabricated using computer aided technology, minimizing material waste. Only two 4’x8’ steel sheets were used in the fabrication of the bench.


Mangonel II , 1980

by Sidney Buchanan

 

Mediums: Steel

Location: Gene Leahy Mall; Gene Leahy Mall 1302 Farnam located on the grass near the water east of the 13th St. Bridge

Owner: City of Omaha

Additional Information: Purchased and donated to city by the Metropolitan Arts Council, Art in Public Places Committee. Mangonel refers to a medieval catapult.


Memorial to Omaha the Horse , 2009

by Unknown

 

Mediums: Bronze, Stone, Concrete

Location: Mid-Town; Stinson Park 67th and West Center Road

Owner: City of Omaha

Additional Information: In 1935, a horse dubbed “Omaha” won the Triple Crown. In 1950, Omaha was relocated to Nebraska to improve thoroughbred racing horses in the state. Omaha made his home at the Grove Porter Farm near Nebraska City and remained there until his death, April 24, 1959. The legendary horse was buried at Aksarben, where he has been memorialized. When Aksarben was torn down, this memorial was erected in Stinson Park.


Monument to Labor , 2003

by Matthew J. Placzek

 

Mediums: Steel

Location: Downtown, Omaha-Council Bluffs Bridge; 601 Riverfront Drive near the river

Owner: City of Omaha

Additional Information: This monument is a salute to the dedication and hard work of all those who built the city of Omaha. It is the second largest labor monument in the United States.


Mother and Child , 2007

by Albert Rhea

 

Mediums: Stainless Steel

Location: Mid-Town; Clarkson Park, located on 40th street between Dodge and Davenport

Owner: City of Omaha

Additional Information: The Joslyn Castle Neighborhood Association sponsored installation of the public art sculpture in Clarkson Park. The project was undertaken with support from the Mayor’s Neighborhood Grant Program. Rhea’s sculpture was selected for both its artistic merit and its suitability for the park location


Omaha Police Memorial , 1994

by John Lajba

 

Mediums: Bronze

Location: Downtown; 505 S. 15th St.

Owner: City of Omaha

Additional Information: This monument represents the men and women of the Omaha Police Department and their families. Since 1887, this organization has served and protected our community in order that we may all live in a free and safe society. It is with respect and appreciation that the citizens of Omaha honor these dedicated people. “We will never forget the ultimate sacrifice made to protect our lives and freedoms.” The base is inscribed with names and dates of police officers killed in the line of duty.


On The Wings of Angels , 2007

by Littleton Alston

 

Mediums: Steel

Location: Downtown; Omaha/Douglas Civic Center, corner of 19th & Farnam Streets.

Owner: City of Omaha

Additional Information: Dedicated on September 11, 2007. Project made possible Woodmen of the World Life Insurance Society, the City of Omaha, Mayor Mike Fahey and more than 300 individuals whose hands were cast in the creation of the sculpture. The molds were used to create cast bronze hands, of as many sizes and shapes as there were contributors. The bronze hands are integrated into the sixteen- foot tall stainless steel sculpture. The public sculpture is a tangible reminder of the 911 tragedy and the heartfelt response by the people of our region. The project budget, totaling approximately $55,000, was paid for by funds that were raised from corporate sponsors and private individuals. The expense total was kept to a minimum because of generous in-kind donations and substantial volunteer work by many individuals, including Alston, who donated nearly all of his services.


Patrick , 1975

by Sidney Buchanan

 

Mediums: Metal

Location: Mid-Town; Pipal Park 7770 Hascall Street

Owner: City of Omaha

Additional Information: The sculpture is named after the artist's son and commemorates one of the most destructive tornadoes in the history of the U.S., which devastated parts of Omaha on May 5, 1975.


Pencil , 1982

by Mac Hornecker

 

Mediums: Metal

Location: Downtown; Next to the pedestrian bridge connecting Leahy Mall to Heartland of America Park at 8th & Douglas Streets

Owner: City of Omaha

Additional Information: The sculpture was originally owned by Ed and Mary Beth Fogarty and on site at their home in Omaha. When their house was sold the sculpture was given to the City of Omaha


Prairie Moon

by Paul Konchagulian

 

Mediums: Steel

Location: Downtown; Northeast corner of the intersection of 20th and Vinton Streets.

Owner: City of Omaha

Additional Information: The Omaha Public Art Commission unanimously approved Omaha by Design's sculpture project at their October 12th, 2016 meeting and accepted the work into the City of Omaha’s Public Art Collection.


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